What You Should Know Before Getting Facial Fillers?

November 27, 2020

Types of facial fillers
Synthetic gels are the most common facial fillers. There are different brands, but they are grouped by the natural body substances they mimic. These include collagen, calcium hydroxyapatite and hyaluronic acid, a glycoprotein that attracts water. Some are harder than others and more likely to swell your skin. Unlike other fillers, autologous fat injections require surgery, as they take fat from another part of your body.

Know Before You Go
Facial fillers involve a medical procedure. Schedule a consultation to inspect the facility and ask questions. You will be more relaxed if your treatment is on a different day.

Each state has rules about who can give facial filler injections. Look for a board-certified plastic surgeon, dermatologist, or ophthalmologist. Ask.

How did you become an experienced facial filler practitioner?
Are you qualified to deal with any issue, no matter how rare?

Choosing a professional environment
Get facial fillers at the infirmary. Don’t do it at a party, salon, spa or someone’s house. Problems are rare, but they can happen, especially with people who don’t know what they’re doing.

target setting
Think carefully about what you want the filler to do for your face – it’s not just about looking younger. You may want to inject them in stages so that you can better guide the results. Ask your doctor for before and after photos of the injections. It’s important to know what success looks like.

Frequently Asked Questions
Your face is a road map of the arteries and veins beneath your skin. It’s normal to experience bruising after an injection. So, redness, slight bleeding and discomfort are also normal. You may be a little swollen at first, too. Give it a week to get used to it.

Other risks
Although most fillers replicate the natural substances already in your body, your body may not like it. Other risks include

skin rash
acne
lump
Allergic reactions to itching
Tactile Warmth Infection
Inflammation may also darken your skin, called hyperpigmentation. This can happen to all skin types, but it’s most common in people of color.

Rare side effects
Dead tissue and blindness do not occur often. In each case, the fillings block the arteries and blood cannot pass through. In both cases, you need immediate help from a dermatologist or other medical professional.

It’s not a panacea.
Facial fillers can add volume to your face, but they cannot change the quality of your skin. If you have deep acne scars, etched lines, brown patches, or other skin problems, discuss treatment options with your dermatologist.

What is the cost?
You will need one or two syringes, depending on the area you are treating. The current average cost is $650 per syringe for 1 year of filler and $900 for 2 years. Most fillers are not covered by Medicare because they are considered cosmetic. If someone quotes you a price that seems too good to be true, the filler may have come from an illegal source.

blood thinner
Tell your doctor about any medications you are taking, including supplements. Any medication that thins the blood, such as prescription drugs, aspirin, or ibuprofen, can make bruises last longer. Most doctors say you should stop using blood thinners 2 weeks before your injection.

No makeup.
To reduce the risk of infection, make sure your face is clean when you show up for your appointment. Your doctor will clean your face again before your injections. You may need to wait about an hour after your procedure to apply your makeup. When you do, use a clean brush and new makeup.